Many mums experience pain in their hands and fingers during pregnancy. The reason is that swelling in the wrists, brought on by pregnancy hormones, causes carpal tunnel syndrome. The condition is usually caused by competitive strain injury but during pregnancy it’s all due to hormonal changes causing the carpal tunnel to swell and narrow, constricting veins and nerves.
 
In most cases, as the hormones from your pregnancy subside, the swelling should subside on it’s own but sometimes it doesn’t and then intervention may be necessary. If your wrist pain, numbness or tingling is interfering with your daily life or with your ability to sleep or work, then it’s probably going to need medical intervention.
 
The first thing you should do about the condition is speak to your doctor or healthcare provider. He or she will examine your wrists and may suggest cortisone injections (safe for breastfeeding mums), a wrist splint or minor surgery to correct the problem. During the operation, a surgeon will cut one of the ligaments in the wrist which will alleviate the pressure on the nerves and should give you full functionality in your wrists and hands, free of pain and other effects.
 
If you have been told that this problem can be solved by taking vitamin B6 supplements, then you should speak to your doctor anyway. This type of vitamin treatment is only effective for carpal tunnel syndrome if you already have a vitamin B6 deficiency but if you are eating properly, that’s highly unlikely.

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