Lyndsey Bell suffered through every mothers worst nightmare. 

 

The mother-of-three was 28 weeks pregnant when she found out there was a problem, with scans showing that her baby was not growing properly. 

 

At 35 weeks,  having experienced sharp pains in her stomach, Lyndsey believed she was in labour and went to the hospital. 

 

The doctors could not find a heart beat, and after being told that her baby would not come out alive, Lyndsey started haemorrhaging.

 

Lyndsey was rushed into the operating theatre, and surgeons were forced to perform a hysterectomy to stop her bleeding.

 

After emerging from an induced coma two days later, Lyndsey found the courage to hold her stillborn baby boy, Rory.

 

 

"I didn't know what he was going to look like. I was scared. I reached out and touched him, he was cold and his cheeks were hard."she told Mail Online

 

Lyndsey, 32, and her husband Mark were determined to give their baby as much love and care as they could before his funeral.

 

Baby Rory was kept in the maternity ward mortuary for 15 days, allowing the parents to visit their stillborn child for a few minutes every day. 

 

"I changed his nappy and rocked him in my arms, and my bond grew and grew."

 

 

 

After two weeks of bathing and caring for Rory, he was buried with Lyndsey's grandfather. 

 

Despite being heartbroken at the loss of her infant son, Lyndsey is not afraid to talk about him, keeping his memory alive. 

 

"People often feel awkward about mentioning Rory's name around me, but I love talking about my son. He's just as much a part of our family as our living children," 

 

"I'll never forget my special baby."

 

For more information about baby Rory, visit the memorial page set up by the Bell family. 

 

SHARE if you think Lyndsey is a wonderful and strong person. 

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