Here are few signs that your teen is probably procrastinating and how you can help them overcome it:
 
Countless study breaks
You’ve lost count of the amount of times you’ve seen your teen in the kitchen that you’re beginning to wonder have they even started studying in the first place. Set out a timetable with your teen, designating the exact amount of study breaks they should take. Explain why it’s important that they don’t go behind their schedule, no matter how tempting.
 
“Online research”
Your teen will probably need to go on the internet for some aspects of their study, but don’t underestimate their abilities to find ways to distract themselves online either. Limit the amount of time your teen spends online and insist they find what they need from the various educational sites where they should print actual copies, instead of constantly staring at a screen. The less time your teen spends online the better, and if necessary take away their phones. They will thank you for it when they’re older.
 
Exercise
While you know fresh air is essential for your teen, they may end up spending a little too much time outside. Your teen definitely needs fresh air, but make sure that you limit their exercise time to within their actual designated study breaks.
 
Easily distracted
Things that never bothered them before are constantly distracting them now. It could be the rain, the birds, chatter in the house or even various objects in their room. Sometimes the best place for your teen to study might not be in their room or even at home, but somewhere were the distractions are very few. Once your teen has an area where they can truly focus, they will find it a little harder to become distracted.
 
Fear
The actual fear of exams and study, can be one of the main reasons behind procrastination. The fear of study, fear of failure and mostly the fear of being exactly unsure where to begin, can be overwhelming for anyone. This is why talking to your teen about their concerns and planning a timetable can be a great relief for your child. Once everything is broken down, the actual idea of study will become less frightening to your teen.

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